Chemicals in cosmetic items can harm women’s hormones
Food & Health  
Hindustan Times

The beauty products you use could be harmful for your reproductive system. A new study shows how cosmetics used in personal care products can cause changes in reproductive hormones.
 

 

The beauty products you use can negatively affect your hormones. A new study has discovered links between chemicals that are widely used in cosmetic and personal care products and changes in reproductive hormones.
 
As part of the study, a total of 509 urine samples were collected from 143 women aged 18 to 44 years, free of known chronic health conditions and birth control to be measured for environmental chemicals that are found in personal care products, such as parabens, which are antimicrobial preservatives, and benzophenones, which are ultraviolet filters. These are usually found in cosmetic products.
 
Pollack noted, head of the study said, “This study is the first to examine mixtures of chemicals that are widely used in personal care products in relation to hormones in healthy, reproductive-age women, using multiple measures of exposure across the menstrual cycle, which improved upon research that relied on one or two measures of chemicals.”
 
This multi-chemical approach closely reflects the real world environmental exposures and shows that even low-level exposure to mixtures of chemicals may affect reproductive hormone levels. Another noteworthy finding of the study is that certain chemical and UV filters were associated with decreased reproductive hormones in multi-chemical exposures while others were associated with increases in other reproductive hormones, underscoring the complexities of these chemicals.
 

 

 

Pollack said, “What we should take away from this study is that we may need to be careful about the chemicals in the beauty and personal care products we use We have early indicators that chemicals such as parabens may increase estrogen levels. If this finding is confirmed by additional research, it could have implications for estrogen-dependent diseases such as breast cancer.”
 
The findings are present in the Journal International Journal Environment International.

 
 


 
 


 
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