Hepatitis C drug may also be effective against Zika virus
Food & Health  
Hindustan Times

 
According to the findings, the repurposed drug effectively protected and rescued neural cells infected by the Zika virus - and blocked transmission of the virus to mouse foetuses.

 

 
Scientists have found that a drug used to treat Hepatitis C may also be effective in treating people infected with Zika virus.
 
According to the findings, the repurposed drug effectively protected and rescued neural cells infected by the Zika virus - and blocked transmission of the virus to mouse foetuses.
 
“There has been a lot of work done in the past year or so to address the Zika health threat. Much of it has focused on developing a vaccine, with promising early results,” said Alysson Muotri, from the University of California - San Diego in the US.
 
“But there is also a great need to develop clinical strategies to treat Zika-infected individuals, including pregnant women for whom prevention of infection is no longer an option,” Muotri said.
 
For the study published in the journal Scientific Reports, the researchers investigated an antiviral drug called sofosbuvir, approved and marketed under the brand name Sovaldi to treat and cure hepatitis C infections.
 
The drug works by inhibiting replication of the hepatitis C virus.
 
They noted that both hepatitis C and Zika belong to the same viral family and bore strong structural similarities that could make sofosbuvir effective against the latter.
 
In addition, it had been reported that sofosbuvir was protective against Zika in different cell types.
 
In tests using human neural progenitor cells (NPCs) - self-renewing, multipotent cells that generate neurons and other brain cell types - the scientists found that exposure to sofosbuvir not only rescued dying NPCs infected with the Zika virus, but restored gene expression linked to their antiviral response.
 
In subsequent tests using an immunodeficient mouse model infected by Zika, intravenous injections of sofosbuvir significantly reduced viral loads in blood serum compared to a placebo group.
 
Moreover, foetuses of Zika-infected pregnant mice did not show detectable Zika virus amplification in the sofosbuvir- treated group.

 
 


 
 


 
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