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All is not lost: How foreign media reacted to Isro losing contact with Chandrayaan-2 lander
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Not only India, but the entire world is applauding the Indian Space Research Organisation for daring to go where no one else has managed to. Here is how foreign media reported the Chandrayaan-2 moon landing.

 

HIGHLIGHTS
 
The entire world is applauding the Indian Space Research Organisation for daring to discover dark side of the Moon
All is not lost for the mission-- American magazine Wired said on Chandrayaan-2 lander's "deviation from its expected trajectory"
The New York Times lauded India's "engineering prowess and decades of space development have combined with its global ambitions"
 
Chandrayaan 2, India's 'complex' mission to the Moon's south pole, made headlines globally after the Indian Space Research Organisation (Isro) lost communication with Vikram Lander of Chandrayaan-2 just moments before its scheduled soft landing on Saturday.
 
Not only India, but the entire world is applauding Isro for daring to go where no one else has managed to. Here is how foreign media reported the Chandrayaan-2 moon landing:
 
All is not lost for the mission--the online edition of American magazine Wired said on Chandrayaan-2 lander's "deviation from its expected trajectory". "The loss of the Vikram lander and the Pragyan rover it was carrying to the lunar surface would be a big blow for India's space program...But all is not lost for the mission," Wired reported.
 
 
The New York Times lauded India's "engineering prowess and decades of space development combined with its global ambitions."
 
However, while referring to Chandrayaan-2 lander's inability to soft-land on the lunar surface as a "partial failure", The New York Times wrote, "an orbiter remains in operation - would delay the country's bid to join an elite club of nations that have landed in one piece on the moon's surface."
 
Like The New York Times, French daily Le Monde mentioned the success rate of soft landing on the moon, but in percentage. It said, "So far, scientists point out, only 45 per cent of missions aimed at alleviating have been successful."
 
Le Monde started its article with words "A broken dream" and said that the Indian newspapers "were quick to titrate their websites, after announcing the worse scenario that could expect the Indian Space Research Organization..."
 
The website quoted an expert from National Aeronautics and Space Administration (Nasa) who had said, "Imagine a spaceship crossing the space at a speed ten times faster than an airplane, and almost stopping to land softly on the Earth - all in minutes and, more importantly, without any human intervention."
 
"The ship Chandrayaan-2 will have known a hard destiny," the website further added mentioning the first attempt to liftoff Chandrayaan-2 on July 15, the plan which was aborted after Isro cited a "technical snag" as the reason to stop the countdown just 56 minutes before the take off.

 

British newspaper The Guardian, in its article titled -- India's moon landing suffers last-minute communications loss, quoted Mathieu Weiss, a representative in India for France's space agency CNES, as saying, "India is going where probably the future settlements of humans will be in 20 years, in 50 years, 100 years."
 
 
The Washington Post wrote, 'India loses contact with its lander as it attempted to land on the moon' as its header. "The incident could now set back India's growing space ambitions, seen as a reflection of the aspirations of its young population," the article read.
 
The American daily further said, "Of the 38 soft-landing attempts made on the moon, only about half have succeeded... India had hoped its Chandrayaan-2 mission would make it the fourth nation to land on the moon after the United States, Russia and China."
 
India's historic landing on moon's polar surface may have failed-- was the headline of the CNN.
 
"The control room in the city of Bengaluru filled with scientists underwent a visible change as updates from the lander faded. The crowd had celebrated every small step during the controlled descent and at 1:55 a.m. local time on Saturday, the moment the landing was expected to take place, silence descended," CNN reported referring to the silence that stuck the mission operations complex at the Isro Telemetry, Tracking and Command Network in Bengaluru after the despair flared through faces of the scientists.
 
 
Isro chief K Sivan said, "Vikram lander descent was as planned and normal performance was observed up to an altitude of 2.1 km. Subsequently, the communications from the lander to ground stations was lost. The data is being analysed."
 
It was an anxious moment for scientists at the Isro and millions in India and abroad when Vikram Lander of Chandrayaan-2 lost contact with Isro's ground control.

 
 


 
 


 
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